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Doogie Howser, M.D. .jpg

Doogie Howser, M.D. is an ABC network medical drama series created by Steven Bochco & David E. Kelley, starring Neil Patrick Harris in the lead role.

The show aired from September 19, 1989 to March 24, 1993, lasting for four seasons & 97 episodes.

It was produced by Steven Bochco Productions, 20th Century Fox Television (seasons 1 to 3) and 20th Television (in season 4).

Plot

The series centered on Doogie Howser, a teenage doctor who balances the challenge of practicing medicine with the everyday problems of his teenage years.

Cast

Main Cast

  • Neil Patrick Harris as Dr. Douglas "Doogie" Howser
  • Max Casella as Vinnie Delphino
  • James B. Sikking as Dr. David Howser
  • Belinda Montgomery as Katherine Howser

Lisa Dean Ryan as Wanda Plenn (seasons 1–2, recurring in season 3)

  • Lucy Boryer as Janine Stewart (seasons 1–3, two episodes in season 4)
  • Lawrence Pressman as Dr. Benjamin Canfield
  • Mitchell Anderson as Dr. Jack McGuire ((seasons 1–2)
  • Kathryn Layng as Mary Margaret "Curly" Spaulding
  • Markus Redmond as Raymond Alexander (seasons 2–4; guest star in season 1)

Recurring Cast

  • Rif Hutton as Dr. Ron Welch
  • Robyn Lively as Michele Faber (seasons 2 and 4)
  • Barry Livingston as Dr. Bob Rickett (seasons 2–4)

Production

Steven Bochco originated the show's concept and asked David E. Kelley to help write the pilot, giving Kelley a "created by" credit.

Neil Patrick Harris was the first actor the show's staff had found that could convincingly play a teenage doctor, but ABC executives opposed his casting.

Bochco's contract required that the network pay an "enormous" penalty if it canceled the project, so ABC was forced to let Bochco film the pilot.

The network still opposed Harris's casting and disliked the pilot, but after positive reception during test screenings, ABC greenlit the show.

Reception

According to Metacritic, Marvin Kitman of Newsday gave the first season of "Doogie Howser, M.D." a 40/100 score and commented: "What a wasted childhood my kids have had, I got to thinking while watching this otherwise normal Doogie Howser. It makes you look at your kids differently. What lazy bums they must be, still in high school at 16."

Scott Weinberg of DVD Talk recommended season two: "It's not high art, but it's a heckuva lot better than what generally passes for your average weeknight sitcom."

Christopher Smith of the Bangor Daily News gave the third season a "C" grade and commented: "No classic, this series. [...T]he show has become gratingly cute, particularly in the episodes “Doogiesomething,” “Double Doogie with Cheese,” and “Lonesome Doog.” Doog, I’m Dooged out."

Accolades

Year Award Result Category Recipient
1990 People's Choice Award Won Favorite New TV Comedy Series
Viewers for Quality Television Award Nominated Best Actor in a Quality Comedy Series Neil Patrick Harris
Best Supporting Actor in a Quality Comedy Series Max Casella
Young Artist Award Won Best Young Actor Starring in a Television Series Neil Patrick Harris
Nominated Best New Television Series
Best Young Actor Guest Starring in a Television Series Michael Bacall
1991 Primetime Emmy Award Won Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special Joe Kenworthy (production sound mixer)
Bill Thiederman (re-recording mixer)
Dean Okrand (re-recording mixer)
Mike Getlin (re-recording mixer)
(for the episode "Doogenstein")
Humanitas Prize Nominated 30 Minute Network or Syndicated Television Nat Bernstein
Mitchel Katlin
(for the episode "To Live and Die in Brentwood")
Young Artist Awards Won Best Young Actor Guest Starring in a Television Series Christopher Pettiet
Best Young Actor Starring in a Television Series Neil Patrick Harris
1992 Primetime Emmy Award Won Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special<td Joe Kenworthy (production sound mixer)
Bill Thiederman (re-recording mixer)
Dean Okrand (re-recording mixer)
Mike Getlin (re-recording mixer)
{{small>(for the episode "Lonesome Doog")
Nominated Outstanding Cinematography for a Series<td Michael D. O'Shea
{{small>(for the episode "Summer Of '91")
Golden Globe Award Nominated Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical Neil Patrick Harris
Young Artist Award Won Best Young Actor Starring in a Television Series
Nominated Best Young Actress Co-starring in a Television Series Lisa Dean Ryan
1993 Primetime Emmy Award Won Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special<td Joe Kenworthy (production sound mixer)
Mike Getlin (re-recording mixer)
Dean Okrand {{small>(re-recording mixer)
Bill Thiederman (re-recording mixer}
(for the episode "Doogie Got a Gun")
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